GUEST(S):

Sinéad O’ Sullivan – Endorse-enrolled nurse in aged care in St. George’s Hospital in Sydney – (+61)0439999320.

Noreen Murray – Clinical nursing specialist in St. George’s Hospital in Sydney – (+61)0412472597.

INTRO:

AMID TURBULENT TIMES IN OUR HEALTHCARE SERVICES, MANY IRISH MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS ARE TURNING ELSEWHERE FOR FRESH OPPORTUNITIES.

THIS BEGS THE QUESTION, HOW DO THE HEALTH SERVICES IN IRELAND COMPARE WITH THOSE AROUND THE WORLD.

HERE TO DISCUSS HER EXPERIENCES IS SINÉAD O’ SULLIVAN, NURSE IN AGED CARE IN ST. GEORGE’S HOSPITAL IN SYDNEY.

HERE TO DISCUSS HER EXPERIENCES IS NOREEN MURRAY, CLINICAL NURSING SPECIALIST IN ST. GEORGE’S HOSPITAL IN SYDNEY.

OUTRO:                                                                         

Sinéad O’ Sullivan, aged care nurse in St. George’s Hospital in Sydney, thank you for speaking with me this morning.

Noreen Murray, clinical nursing specialist in St. George’s Hospital, thank you very much for coming on this morning.

TEASERS:

Irish working abroad: I speak to two Irish nurses working in Australia.

Doctor Where: we discuss the difference between healthcare professionals working at home and working abroad.

SUGGESTED QUESTIONS:

  • When did you move to Australia from Ireland?
  • Why did you leave Ireland?
  • Why Australia and not the likes of the United States of America?
  • What is your role in St. George’s? How does it compare to your role in Ireland when you worked there?
  • How would you compare the training in St. George’s compared to your training in Ireland?
  • What are the advantages of working as a nurse in Australia compared to Ireland?
  • What are the disadvantages to working as a nurse in Australia compared to Ireland or is there any?
  • Do you think that your career has benefitted from your move to Australia and, if so, what kind of benefits?
  • How do the working conditions in Australia compare to the ones that you experienced in Ireland?
  • Ireland has its own health sector crisis at the moment, what do you make of the current situation in the Irish health services?
  • Have you any regrets regarding leaving Ireland?
  • Have you experienced an increase in Irish health professionals working in St. George’s since you started working there?

BACKGROUND READING:

ARTICLE FROM THE IRISH EXAMINER – FEBRUARY 2017

438 patients on trolleys as 44% wait over 9 hours. By Evelyn Ring

Almost 44% of admitted patients on trolleys yesterday were waiting more than 9 hours for a hospital bed, it has emerged.

There were 438 patients on trolleys in acute hospitals across the country and 193 were waiting over nine hours, according to the Health Service Executive’s ‘TrolleyGar’ figures.

The number of patients on trolleys recorded by the HSE yesterday at 8am represents a 13% increase on trolley waits on the same day last year.

By 2pm, the number of patients on trolleys had reduced to 287, but those waiting more than nine hours was still high, at 173.

Tallaght Hospital in Dublin had 37 patients on trolleys; Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and Cork University Hospital each had 31 while University Hospital Limerick had 28.

According to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation, there were 536 patients on trolleys in emergency departments and in wards waiting to be admitted to a bed yesterday.

The INMO found CUH had the highest number for the second day in a row this week, with 48. On Monday there were 39 patients on trolleys in CUH, the second largest number after UHL which had 40.

Yesterday, UHL had the second highest number of patients on trolleys, with 45, followed by Beaumont, 38 and Tallaght, 35.

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